A baseball game between Texas junior colleges took a bizarre turn Wednesday when the pitcher decided to tackle a batter who was rounding the bases after a home run.

In the top of the sixth inning of a seven-inning game at Weatherford College, near Fort Worth, North Central Texas College freshman Josh Phillips hit a home run to give the Lions the lead, ESPN reported.

After he rounded third base, Weatherford’s pitcher, sophomore Owen Woodward, sprinted toward Phillips and tackled him.

“Oh, oh my!” the stunned announcer said. “Oh no! Oh no. That was out of nowhere. Woodward just attacking the — sorry, I just — Phillips right there.”

NCTC’s dugout then emptied as Phillips’ teammates piled on top of Woodward.

The two players were eventually separated, and Woodward’s teammates escorted him to the Weatherford dugout, USA Today reported.

Despite being tackled by the 6-foot-3, 195-pound pitcher, Phillips got up and stepped on home plate.

It is still unclear why Woodward decided to tackle Phillips, although frustration over surrendering a home run likely played a role.

Weatherford said the college and its police department are investigating the incident.

“The WC student in question will face potential disciplinary action from the Office of Student Services up to and possibly including expulsion,” the school said.

In a statement Wednesday, Coyotes baseball coach Jeff Lightfoot said, “We are shocked and disappointed at what happened in our game today.”

“We do not condone this type of behavior. We have worked hard to build a program with the highest of standards. We are completely embarrassed by this incident, and we apologize to North Central Texas College and the fans of WC baseball. This type of behavior cannot be tolerated,” Lightfoot added.

Lightfoot said the pitcher had not had any other incidents like this, according to ESPN.

After the tackle and the following fight, the umpires suspended the game.

It was the first game of a four-game series between the two junior colleges.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.