An elderly resident of a Chicago suburb was robbed at gunpoint on Tuesday after opening her door to people pretending to sell candy.

According to police, the Oak Lawn woman’s doorbell rang about 6 p.m.

At the door was a female “posing as if she was selling candy,” the Oak Lawn Police Department said in a news release, according to WMAQ-TV in Chicago.

A male with a handgun then forced his way into the home and knocked the elderly woman to the ground, police said. She was held on the ground at gunpoint while a second man entered, and the robbers ransacked her home.

The robbers then fled the scene with a fourth person who was driving a white Kia Optima, police said.

The elderly woman suffered minor injuries in the attack.

Oak Lawn police tweeted photos of the suspects that were captured by a nearby security camera.

This is not the first time something like this has happened.

On March 8, a woman in Stockton, California, experienced a similar situation.

In broad daylight, a young man knocked at her door pretending to sell candy. The woman opened the door and was then attacked by three other people with guns.

Overall, there has been a significant increase in crime in the United States, particularly since 2020.

Gun assaults rose 8 percent, aggravated assaults went up 4 percent and robbery rates overall went up 1 percent in 2021, the Council on Criminal Justice reported.

Murders were up 5 percent from 2020 to 2021, continuing a trend from the previous year.

“The U.S. murder rate rose 30% between 2019 and 2020 – the largest single-year increase in more than a century, according to data published this month by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC),” Pew Research reported.

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One of the authors of the Council on Criminal Justice report, Richard Rosenfeld, said rising prices in recent months might have a connection to the rise in crime.

Inflation hit 7.9 percent in February, which was the highest rate since 1982, Trading Economics reported.

“There’s a good deal of research indicating that when inflation is up, crime rates tend to go up,” Rosenfeld told CBS News. “And so what I think we need to keep our eye on as the pandemic — let’s hope — continues to recede, is the impact of inflation on crime.”

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.